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Relationships between Vegetational Structure and Predation of Artificial Sage Grouse Nests

Anita K. DeLong, John A. Crawford and Don C. DeLong, Jr.
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 59, No. 1 (Jan., 1995), pp. 88-92
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3809119
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3809119
Page Count: 5
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Relationships between Vegetational Structure and Predation of Artificial Sage Grouse Nests
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Abstract

Because of high nest predation and long-term declines in sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) productivity in Oregon, we assessed the effects of vegetational cover and height on predation of artificial sage grouse nests (n = 330). Artificial nest fate was positively associated with tall grass cover and medium-height shrub cover collectively (P = 0.01). No other vegetation, predator, temporal, or spatial variables explained any additional variation in the probability of predation. This study supports the hypothesis that greater amounts of tall grass and medium-height shrub cover at nest sites lower risk of nest predation for sage grouse. Management practices that increase cover and height of native grasses in sagebrush communities with medium-height shrubs are recommended to enhance sage grouse productivity.

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