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Effectiveness of Capsaicin and Bitrex Repellents for Deterring Browsing by Captive Mule Deer

William F. Andelt, Kenneth P. Burnham and Dan L. Baker
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 58, No. 2 (Apr., 1994), pp. 330-334
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3809398
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3809398
Page Count: 5
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Effectiveness of Capsaicin and Bitrex Repellents for Deterring Browsing by Captive Mule Deer
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Abstract

Because mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and white-tailed deer (O. virginianus) cause extensive and costly damage to orchards, nurseries, shelterbelts, and ornamental plantings in Colorado, we evaluated 3 concentrations (0.062, 0.62, and 6.2%) of Hot Sauce Animal Repellent® (Hot Sauce), habanero peppers, Tabasco® sauce, Ani-spray®, and liquid MGK® Big Game Repellent (BGR) as browsing deterrents on tame mule deer from 31 December 1991 to 25 January 1992. While consumption of apple twigs treated with Anispray and the 0.062% concentration of Hot Sauce did not differ (P > 0.05) from the control (tap water), a 6.2% concentration of Hot Sauce (100 times the concentration labeled for deer) and BGR reduced (P < 0.05) consumption relative to the control and other repellents. Although the 6.2% concentration of Hot Sauce and BGR were the most effective browsing deterrents, their effectiveness may be relatively short lived if deer are continually exposed to them.

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