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Diurnal versus 24-Hour Sampling of Habitat Use

E. Beyer, Jr. and Jonathan B. Haufler
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 58, No. 1 (Jan., 1994), pp. 178-180
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3809566
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3809566
Page Count: 3
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Diurnal versus 24-Hour Sampling of Habitat Use
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Abstract

Habitat use estimates may be biased if the sampling design does not consider differences in a species' habitat use throughout a 24-hour period. We reviewed studies to examine the suitability of sampling designs in determining habitat use relative to a species daily activity pattern. Of 56 studies we reviewed, 22 presented data only from daylight sampling and 12 did not describe their methods with enough detail to determine when sampling occurred. Elk (Cervus elaphus) habitat use throughout the entire 24-hour period was different (P < 0.001) from that during diurnal hours. Managers should be cautious when implementing management strategies developed only from diurnal datasets.

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