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Disarticulated Voices: Feminism and Philomela

Elissa Marder
Hypatia
Vol. 7, No. 2, Philosophy and Language (Spring, 1992), pp. 148-166
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Hypatia, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3810003
Page Count: 19
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Disarticulated Voices: Feminism and Philomela
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Abstract

By juxtaposing readings of selected feminist critics with a reading of Ovid's account of Philomela's rape and silencing, this essay interrogates the rhetorical, political, and epistemological implications of the feminist "we." As a political intervention that comes into being as a response to women's oppression, feminism must posit a collective "we." But this feminist "we" is best understood as an impersonal, performative pronoun whose political force is not derived from a knowable referent.

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