Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Review: Mothering, Diversity, and Peace Politics

Reviewed Works: Maternal Thinking: Toward a Politics of Peace by Sara Ruddick; Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness and the Politics of Empowerment by Patricia Hill Collins
Review by: Alison Bailey
Hypatia
Vol. 9, No. 2, Feminism and Peace (Spring, 1994), pp. 188-198
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Hypatia, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3810177
Page Count: 11
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Mothering, Diversity, and Peace Politics
Preview not available

Abstract

The most popular uniting theme in feminist peace literature grounds women's peace work in mothering. I argue if maternal arguments do not address the variety of relationships different races and classes of mothers have to institutional violence and/or the military, then the resulting peace politics can only draw incomplete conclusions about the relationships between maternal work/thinking and peace. To illustrate this I compare two models of mothering: Sara Ruddick's decription of "maternal practice" and Patricia Hill Collins's account of racial-ethnic women's "motherwork."

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[188]
    [188]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
189
    189
  • Thumbnail: Page 
190
    190
  • Thumbnail: Page 
191
    191
  • Thumbnail: Page 
192
    192
  • Thumbnail: Page 
193
    193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
194
    194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197
  • Thumbnail: Page 
198
    198