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Review: Mothering, Diversity, and Peace Politics

Reviewed Works: Maternal Thinking: Toward a Politics of Peace by Sara Ruddick; Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness and the Politics of Empowerment by Patricia Hill Collins
Review by: Alison Bailey
Hypatia
Vol. 9, No. 2, Feminism and Peace (Spring, 1994), pp. 188-198
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Hypatia, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3810177
Page Count: 11
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Mothering, Diversity, and Peace Politics
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Abstract

The most popular uniting theme in feminist peace literature grounds women's peace work in mothering. I argue if maternal arguments do not address the variety of relationships different races and classes of mothers have to institutional violence and/or the military, then the resulting peace politics can only draw incomplete conclusions about the relationships between maternal work/thinking and peace. To illustrate this I compare two models of mothering: Sara Ruddick's decription of "maternal practice" and Patricia Hill Collins's account of racial-ethnic women's "motherwork."

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