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Identity, Knowledge, and Toni Morrison's "Beloved": Questions about Understanding Racism

Susan E. Babbitt
Hypatia
Vol. 9, No. 3 (Summer, 1994), pp. 1-18
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Hypatia, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3810186
Page Count: 18
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Identity, Knowledge, and Toni Morrison's "Beloved": Questions about Understanding Racism
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Abstract

In discussing Drucilla Cornell's remarks about Toni Morrison's Beloved, I consider epistemological questions raised by the acquiring of understanding of racism, particularly the deep-rooted racism embodied in social norms and values. I suggest that questions about understanding racism are, in part, questions about personal and political identities and that questions about personal and political identities are often, importantly, epistemological questions.

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