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Making Waves and Drawing Lines: The Politics of Defining the Vicissitudes of Feminism

Cathryn Bailey
Hypatia
Vol. 12, No. 3, Third Wave Feminisms (Summer, 1997), pp. 17-28
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Hypatia, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3810220
Page Count: 12
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Making Waves and Drawing Lines: The Politics of Defining the Vicissitudes of Feminism
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Abstract

If there actually is a third wave of feminism, it is too close to the second wave for its definition to be clear and uncontroversial, a fact which emphasizes the political nature of declaring the existence of this third wave. Through an examination of some third wave literature, a case is made for emphasizing the continuity of the second and third waves without blurring the differences between older and younger feminists.

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