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Colonialism and Its Others: Considerations on Rights and Care Discourses

Uma Narayan
Hypatia
Vol. 10, No. 2 (Spring, 1995), pp. 133-140
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Hypatia, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3810285
Page Count: 8
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Colonialism and Its Others: Considerations on Rights and Care Discourses
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Abstract

I point to a colonial care discourse that enabled colonizers to define themselves in relationship to "inferior" colonized subjects. The colonized, however, had very different accounts of this relationship. While contemporary care discourse correctly insists on acknowledging human needs and relationships, it needs to worry about who defines these often contested terms. I conclude that improvements along dimensions of care and of justice often provide "enabling conditions" for each other.

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