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Sophie Doesn't: Families and Counterstories of Self-Trust

Hilde Lindemann Nelson
Hypatia
Vol. 11, No. 1, The Family and Feminist Theory (Winter, 1996), pp. 91-104
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Hypatia, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3810357
Page Count: 14
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Sophie Doesn't: Families and Counterstories of Self-Trust
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Abstract

Girls learn the lesson of cognitive deference most clearly, perhaps, growing up in patriarchal families. Taught to discount their own judgments and to depend on those of the family's dominant men, they lose self-trust and cannot take themselves seriously as moral deliberators. I argue that through the telling of counterstories, which undermine normative stories of oppression, it is sometimes possible for women to reclaim these families as places where they have cognitive authority.

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