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Not an Indian Tradition: The Sexual Colonization of Native Peoples

Andrea Smith
Hypatia
Vol. 18, No. 2, Indigenous Women in the Americas (Spring, 2003), pp. 70-85
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Hypatia, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3811012
Page Count: 16
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Not an Indian Tradition: The Sexual Colonization of Native Peoples
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Abstract

This paper analyzes the connections between sexual violence and colonialism in the lives and histories of Native peoples in the United States. This paper argues that sexual violence does not simply just occur within the process of colonialism, but that colonialism is itself structured by the logic of sexual violence. Furthermore, this logic of sexual violence continues to structure U. S. policies toward Native peoples today. Consequently, anti-sexual violence and anti-colonial struggles cannot be separated.

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