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Stories from the South: A Question of Logic

Susan E. Babbitt
Hypatia
Vol. 20, No. 3 (Summer, 2005), pp. 1-21
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Hypatia, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3811112
Page Count: 21
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Stories from the South: A Question of Logic
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Abstract

In this paper, I argue that stories about difference do not promote critical self and social understanding; rather, on the contrary, it is the way we understand ourselves that makes some stories relevantly different. I discuss the uncritical reception of a story about homosexuality in Cuba, urging attention to generalizations explaining judgments of importance. I suggest that some stories from the South will never be relevant to discussions about human flourishing until we critically examine ideas about freedom and democracy, and their role in national identity, explaining the significance we give, or not, to such stories.

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