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Through Thick and Thin: Validity and Reflective Judgment

April Flakne
Hypatia
Vol. 20, No. 3 (Summer, 2005), pp. 115-126
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Hypatia, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3811117
Page Count: 12
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Through Thick and Thin: Validity and Reflective Judgment
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Abstract

The application of "thick" ethical concepts is best understood as a process of reflective rather than deductive judgment. Taking the form "B is as X as A," where X is a thick ethical concept and A and B are narrative wholes unified through X (for example, "Those who hid Jews from the Nazis were as brave as Achilles"), reflective judgment opens thick ethical concepts to transformation. Though interpretive, such reflective judgment may still be able to provide validity without recourse to "thin," purportedly context-neutral terms.

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