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Contraceptive Self-Efficacy: A Perspective on Teenage Girls' Contraceptive Behavior

Ruth Andrea Levinson
The Journal of Sex Research
Vol. 22, No. 3 (Aug., 1986), pp. 347-369
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3812572
Page Count: 23
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Contraceptive Self-Efficacy: A Perspective on Teenage Girls' Contraceptive Behavior
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Abstract

This research investigated the relationship between the socialpsychological theory of self-efficacy and teenage girls' contraceptive behavior. Data were obtained from 258 female clients, aged 20 or younger, of a family planning clinic. Four factors were extracted from the contraceptive self-efficacy (CSE) scale developed for this investigation. Regression analyses were used to determine whether CSE scores distinguished patterns of contraceptive use when the effects of the influential demographic, sexual experience, and psychosocial variables were controlled. Two of the four CSE factors contributed significantly new information in accounting for the variance in the contraceptive use measure, semipartial R = .26, semipartial R2(4,163) = .07, p < .01. The relationship between study variables and the four CSE factor scores were examined in a canonical correlation analysis to understand better the characteristics of the contraceptively self-efficacious teenager. The results support the proposition that girls with a high CSE orientation think that they should and can be responsible for their sexual activity and act accordingly to achieve contraceptive protection. Girls with a low CSE orientation may be ineffective contraceptors, because they experience conflict regarding their strong sexual feelings and activities. Implications for interventions are discussed.

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