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A Comparison of Social Nudists and Non-Nudists on Experience with Various Sexual Outlets

Marilyn D. Story
The Journal of Sex Research
Vol. 23, No. 2 (May, 1987), pp. 197-211
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3812591
Page Count: 15
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A Comparison of Social Nudists and Non-Nudists on Experience with Various Sexual Outlets
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Abstract

I investigated the sexual experience of social nudists (including sexual guilt and sexual inhibitions) compared with that of a matched, non-nudist sample. Much popular belief connects nudism with sexually permissive behaviors, but researchers have shown that social nudists have strict sexual conduct rules and that social nudists mentally separate nudity and sex, seeing nude bodies as "natural" and "pure" rather than sexually arousing. Therefore, I hypothesized that, when compared to non-nudists, (a) fewer social nudists had experienced less socially acceptable sexual outlets, (b) more social nudists felt guilt about their sexual behaviors, and (c) more social nudists wished they had engaged in a sexual behavior they had not experienced. One hundred social nudists and 100 non-nudists, matched according to sex, age, educational level, marital status, and area of the country, answered 25 questions on sexual experience, sexual guilt, and desire to experience sexual behaviors they had not, as well as on honesty of their responses. All three hypotheses were supported. These results illustrate that the sexual implications of nudity vary among people and that there is no direct relationship between nudity and sexually permissive behaviors.

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