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Early Sex and Its Behavioral Consequences in New Zealand

Peter Davis and Roy Lay-Yee
The Journal of Sex Research
Vol. 36, No. 2 (May, 1999), pp. 135-144
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3813207
Page Count: 10
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Early Sex and Its Behavioral Consequences in New Zealand
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Abstract

A steady trend towards earlier sexual intercourse is now well documented. However, the relationship of this development to trends in other early sexual formative experiences has not been explored, nor has there been an analysis of the longerterm behavioral consequences. The data examined in this paper were drawn from a two-stage national survey of sexual lifestyles on a sample of 2,361 adult New Zealanders in the age range 18-54. Techniques of survival analysis and multiple logistic regression were used. Over time there was a consistent decline and diminishing gap in age of onset for first experience, first intercourse, and first regular partnership. Multivariate analysis confirms that males, the young, the less educated, ethnic minorities, and respondents professing no religious affiliation were all more likely to report earlier onset of sexual experiences. However, while all three socio-sexual events showed the same trend, pre-intercourse experiences exerted the strongest influence on subsequent sexual practices and outcomes. This has implications for preventive strategies.

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