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Journal Article

Commercial Sex between Men: A Prospective Diary-Based Study

Victor Minichiello, Rodrigo Mariño, Jan Browne, Maggie Jamieson, Kirk Peterson, Brad Reuter and Kenn Robinson
The Journal of Sex Research
Vol. 37, No. 2 (May, 2000), pp. 151-160
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3813600
Page Count: 10
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Commercial Sex between Men: A Prospective Diary-Based Study
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Abstract

This paper describes the results of a self-reporting dairy completed by 186 male sex workers (MSWs) over a 2-week period in Brisbane, Sydney, and Melbourne, Australia. The diary was completed following each commercial sex encounter by the MSW. The results reveal that MSWs reported 2088 commercial sex encounters during the study period, with an average of 11.2 encounters per MSW. The majority of sex encounters took place in either the client's or the MSW's residence, with significant variations by city. The average sexual encounter lasted 70 minutes, and comprised two sexual acts, masturbation and oral sex. Condom use was reported in 67.4% of all the encounters. Using the AIDS Council safe-sex classification system, the majority of the commercial sex encounters fell in the "safer sex" category; however, there were significant differences by source of clients and place of the encounter. Use of drugs and alcohol reveal interesting patterns: Clients were more likely to use alcohol, while MSWs had significant differences of usage of the different drugs. This study demonstrates that the majority of MSWs are offering and practicing safe sex behaviours, however, MSWs working in the street setting are still likely to be practising unsafe sex. Male sex work is becoming an organised business and this provides opportunities to implement further public health interventions.

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