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The Black Action Film: The End of the Patiently Enduring Black Hero

Mark A. Reid
Film History
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Winter, 1988), pp. 23-36
Published by: Indiana University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3814948
Page Count: 14
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The Black Action Film: The End of the Patiently Enduring Black Hero
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Abstract

This paper describes and analyzes the socio-economic and political forces of the 1960s which gave rise to the black action film of the 1970s. In analyzing the reception of these films by black audiences, the paper argues against the notion of a monolithic black audience for black action films. Finally, it suggests that the production of these films permitted blacks their largest opportunities to direct mainstream American films.

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