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Shooting the Great War: Albert Dawson and the American Correspondent Film Company, 1914-1918

Ron van Dopperen
Film History
Vol. 4, No. 2 (1990), pp. 123-129
Published by: Indiana University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3814997
Page Count: 7
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Shooting the Great War: Albert Dawson and the American Correspondent Film Company, 1914-1918
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Abstract

In the early days of World War I, a secret film campaign was brought to the United States. In an effort to control public opinion in this important neutral country, German officials set up The American Correspondent Film Company. As a front man in this organization, Albert K. Dawson, an American news cameraman, was sent to Berlin. Dawson's camera covered the troops all the way from Flanders' mud to the gates of Przemysl, Poland, but he suffered professionally following the collapse of the American Correspondent Film Company. This article is a short study into the risks and perils of film propaganda.

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