If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Making (and Unmaking) of "Pull My Daisy"

Blaine Allan
Film History
Vol. 2, No. 3 (Sep. - Oct., 1988), pp. 185-205
Published by: Indiana University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3815117
Page Count: 21
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Making (and Unmaking) of
Preview not available

Abstract

This article provides an account of the production of "PULL MY DAISY" (1959). A key film of the United States avant-garde of the 1950s, of the New American Cinema, and of the Beat Generation, it has generally been understood in terms of improvisation, corresponding to the tenets of "Spontaneous Prose" characteristic of Beat literature. However, the production practices of filmmakers Alfred Leslie and Robert Frank, working with a text by Jack Kerouac, demonstrated the lure of legitimacy and represented the attempted intervention of independent and marginal filmmakers in a form of commercial and professional cinema.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
185
    185
  • Thumbnail: Page 
186
    186
  • Thumbnail: Page 
187
    187
  • Thumbnail: Page 
188
    188
  • Thumbnail: Page 
189
    189
  • Thumbnail: Page 
190
    190
  • Thumbnail: Page 
191
    191
  • Thumbnail: Page 
192
    192
  • Thumbnail: Page 
193
    193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
194
    194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197
  • Thumbnail: Page 
198
    198
  • Thumbnail: Page 
199
    199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
200
    200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205