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Cecil B. DeMille and the Lasky Company: Legitimating Feature Film as Art

Sumiko Higashi
Film History
Vol. 4, No. 3 (1990), pp. 181-197
Published by: Indiana University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3815132
Page Count: 17
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Cecil B. DeMille and the Lasky Company: Legitimating Feature Film as Art
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Abstract

This article documents the strategy of the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company to exploit the affinity between stage and screen in order to acquire cultural legitimacy during an era of progressive reform. Ultimately, Lasky filmmakers were instrumental in gaining cinema recognition as an art form, but in the process, they unwittingly contributed to the erosion of the line between high and low culture. Of particular significance in these developments was the career of Cecil B. DeMille, a director whose later spectacles have overshadowed the brilliance of his achievement in the teens.

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