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The Ethical Context in Organizations: Influences on Employee Attitudes and Behaviors

Linda Klebe Treviño, Kenneth D. Butterfield and Donald L. McCabe
Business Ethics Quarterly
Vol. 8, No. 3, Psychological and Pedagogical Issues in Business Ethics (Jul., 1998), pp. 447-476
DOI: 10.2307/3857431
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3857431
Page Count: 30
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The Ethical Context in Organizations: Influences on Employee Attitudes and Behaviors
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Abstract

This field survey focused on two constructs that have been developed to represent the ethical context in organizations: ethical climate and ethical culture. We first examined issues of convergence and divergence between these constructs through factor analysis and correlational analysis. Results suggested that the two constructs are measuring somewhat different, but strongly related dimensions of the ethical context. We then investigated the relationships between the emergent ethical context factors and an ethics-related attitude (organizational commitment) and behavior (observed unethical conduct) for respondents who work in organizations with and without ethics codes. Regression results indicated that an ethical culture-based dimension was more strongly associated with observed unethical conduct in code organizations while climate-based dimensions were more strongly associated with observed unethical conduct in non-code organizations. Ethical culture and ethical climate-based factors influenced organizational commitment similarly in both types of organizations. Normative implications of the study are discussed, as are implications for future theorizing, research and management practice.

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