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A Report on the Historic Spawning Grounds of the Striped Bass, "Morone Saxatilis"

Michael J. Little
Maine Naturalist
Vol. 3, No. 2 (1995), pp. 107-113
Published by: Eagle Hill Institute
DOI: 10.2307/3858211
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3858211
Page Count: 7
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A Report on the Historic Spawning Grounds of the Striped Bass, "Morone Saxatilis"
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Abstract

The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) has been an important food and sport fish in the Gulf of Maine since colonial times. Fisheries biologists have worked to preserve the stocks of this fish by protecting its breeding grounds in Chesapeake Bay, where 90 percent of the striped bass in the waters of the northeastern United States breed. A look at the historical records, indicates that this was not the only breeding ground for striped bass, but rather that they, at one time, spawned in almost every river on the New England coast. Diaries, treatises and town histories hold a wealth of knowledge about the plenitude of striped bass and the importance of the fishery to the colonies and the states of New England until the end of the nineteenth century. Perhaps the key to the protection of striped bass stocks lies in the restoration of them to their old breeding grounds.

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