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Antibodies to Some Pathogenic Agents in Free-Living Wild Species in Tanzania

C. Hamblin, E. C. Anderson, M. Jago, T. Mlengeya and K. Hirji
Epidemiology and Infection
Vol. 105, No. 3 (Dec., 1990), pp. 585-594
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3863828
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Antibodies to Some Pathogenic Agents in Free-Living Wild Species in Tanzania
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Abstract

A total of 535 sera from eight species of wildlife were collected from different game areas in Tanzania between 1987 and 1989. These sera were tested for antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease, bovine herpes virus types 1 and 2, lumpy skin disease, bovine viral diarrhoea, Akabane, bovine ephemeral fever, bluetongue, enzootic bovine leucosis, African horse sickness and African swine fever viruses and Brucella abortus based on the expected species susceptibility. Sera from buffalo Syncerus caffer, wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus and topi Damaliscus korrigum contained antibodies against the majority of the pathogens tested. Antibodies to fewer pathogens were detected in sera from the other species. No antibodies to lumpy skin disease virus were detected in any of the sera examined. African horse sickness antibodies were detected in sera from Zebra and African swine fever antibodies were detected in wart hog. The occurrence of antibodies to these agents suggests that wild species act as reservoirs of infection for some of these pathogens. However, until the susceptibility of individual species is proven by isolation of the aetiological agents their role must remain speculative.

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