Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Problems of Tracing a Geographically Widespread Outbreak of Salmonellosis from a Commonly Eaten Food: Salmonella typhimurium DT193 in North West England and North Wales in 1991

L. Thornton, S. Gray, P. Bingham, R. L. Salmon, D. N. Hutchinson, B. Rowe, D. Newton and Q. U. Syed
Epidemiology and Infection
Vol. 111, No. 3 (Dec., 1993), pp. 465-471
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3863842
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($49.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Problems of Tracing a Geographically Widespread Outbreak of Salmonellosis from a Commonly Eaten Food: Salmonella typhimurium DT193 in North West England and North Wales in 1991
Preview not available

Abstract

Geographically widespread outbreaks involving commonly isolated organisms and where the vehicles of infection are commonly eaten foodstuffs pose particular difficulties at a technical and organizational level. An outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium infection, affecting 39 people, spread over a wide area in North West England and North Wales in April and May 1991, was detected thanks to the practice of sending specimens to the national reference laboratory where phage typing and characterizing of antibiotic resistance patterns enabled the identification of a cluster of distinctive isolates (S. typhimurium DT193 resistant to sulphonamides, trimethoprim and furazolidone). An investigation, involving twenty environmental health departments in addition to health authorities and the Public Health Laboratory Service, showed an association between the illness and eating loose sliced cooked ham (P = 0·004). Detailed tracing of the chain of supply of the ham showed this to be particularly cooked ham originating from a single small local producer (P = 0·000 03). Further investigation of that producer revealed that a batch of ham distributed on one day in early April was undercooked due to a malfunction in cooking equipment.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
465
    465
  • Thumbnail: Page 
466
    466
  • Thumbnail: Page 
467
    467
  • Thumbnail: Page 
468
    468
  • Thumbnail: Page 
469
    469
  • Thumbnail: Page 
470
    470
  • Thumbnail: Page 
471
    471