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A Large Salmonellosis Outbreak Associated with a Frequently Penalized Restaurant

S. P. Luby, J. L. Jones and J. M. Horan
Epidemiology and Infection
Vol. 110, No. 1 (Feb., 1993), pp. 31-39
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3863879
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Large Salmonellosis Outbreak Associated with a Frequently Penalized Restaurant
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Abstract

Between January and June 1990, Restaurant A in Greenville, South Carolina repeatedly failed local health department inspection and was repeatedly sanctioned. In September 1990, two persons, hospitalized with salmonellosis after attending a convention catered by Restaurant A, contacted the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. We inspected Restaurant A, interviewed food handlers, and surveyed by telephone persons from every sixth business attending the convention. Of 398 persons interviewed, 135 (34%) reported gastroenteritis. Nine had culture-confirmed salmonella infection. People who ate turkey were 4·6 times more likely to become ill than those who did not eat turkey (95% confidence interval 2·0, 10·6). We estimate that of 2430 attendees, 824 became ill. Sanitarians judged Restaurant A's kitchen too small to prepare over 500 meals safely. The cooked turkey was unrefrigerated for several hours, incompletely rewarmed, and rinsed with water to reduce its offensive odour prior to serving. Stronger sanctions may be needed against restaurants that repeatedly fail local health department inspection.

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