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Genealogical Analyses of Rabies Virus Strains from Brazil Based on N Gene Alleles

M. B. Heinemann, F. M. C. Fernandes-Matioli, A. Cortez, R. M. Soares, S. M. Sakamoto, F. Bernardi, F. H. Ito, A. M. B. N. Madeira and L. J. Richtzenhain
Epidemiology and Infection
Vol. 128, No. 3 (Jun., 2002), pp. 503-511
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3864752
Page Count: 9
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Genealogical Analyses of Rabies Virus Strains from Brazil Based on N Gene Alleles
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Abstract

Thirty rabies virus isolates from cows and vampire bats from different regions of São Paulo State, Southeastern Brazil and three rabies vaccines were studied genetically. The analysis was based on direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products of 600 nucleotides coding for the amino terminus of nucleoprotein gene. The sequences were checked to verify their genealogical and evolutionary relationships and possible implication for health programmes. Statistical data indicated that there were no significant genetic differences between samples isolated from distinct hosts, from different geographical regions and between samples collected in the last two decades. According to the HKA test, the variability observed in the sequences is probably due to genetic drift. Since changes in genetic material may produce modifications in the protein responsible for immunogenicity of virus, which may eventually cause vaccine failure in herds, we suggest that continuous efforts in monitoring genetic diversity in rabies virus field strains, in relation to vaccine strains, must be conducted.

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