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Real-Time Application of Automated Ribotyping and DNA Macrorestriction Analysis in the Setting of a Listeriosis Outbreak

T. J. J. Inglis, A. Clair, J. Sampson, L. O'Reilly, S. Vandenberg, K. Leighton and A. Watson
Epidemiology and Infection
Vol. 131, No. 1 (Aug., 2003), pp. 637-645
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3865572
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Real-Time Application of Automated Ribotyping and DNA Macrorestriction Analysis in the Setting of a Listeriosis Outbreak
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Abstract

A cluster of three cases of listeriosis cases occurred against a background of endemic listeriosis in Western Australia. Human and environmental isolates of Listeria monocytogenes obtained during the outbreak investigation were rapidly subtyped by automated ribotyping using an EcoRI protocol and a RiboPrinter®. DNA macrorestriction analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to confirm the relatedness of isolates. Serogroup 1/2 predominated among the food samples and the four clinical isolates from the outbreak cluster were also of this serogroup. All isolates from chicken material were serogroup 1/2 and indistinguishable by ribotype pattern. PFGE subdivided strains of this ribotype into four subtypes. The preliminary analysis had an immediate impact on hypothesis generation, environmental health investigations, environmental specimen collection and initial control measures. Sufficient typing data to guide environmental health and disease control initiatives was generated in less than one week by combining automated ribotyping with PCR-based detection of L. monocytogenes in suspect foodstuffs and an L. monocytogenes DNA probe. There were no further cases of bacteriologically confirmed listeriosis in Western Australia for six months after completion of the investigation.

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