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Relations between the Consumption of Antimicrobial Growth Promoters and the Occurrence of Resistance among Enterococcus faecium Isolated from Broilers

H.-D. Emborg, J. S. Andersen, A. M. Seyfarth and H. C. Wegener
Epidemiology and Infection
Vol. 132, No. 1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 95-105
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3865848
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Relations between the Consumption of Antimicrobial Growth Promoters and the Occurrence of Resistance among Enterococcus faecium Isolated from Broilers
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Abstract

The present study investigates, at farm level, the effect of the time-span between sampling and the last time a particular antimicrobial growth promoter (AGP) was included in the feed on the probability of selecting an AGP-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolate from a broiler flock. The probability that a randomly selected E. faecium isolate was resistant to avilamycin, erythromycin or virginiamycin was 0·91, 0·92 and 0·84, respectively if the isolate originated from a broiler flock fed either avilamycin- or virginiamycin-supplemented feed. As the time-span between sampling and the last AGP consumption increased, the probability of isolating an E. faecium isolate resistant to a particular AGP decreased (probability <0·2 within 3-5 years after last exposure to AGPs). The decrease in probability over time showed little farm-to-farm variation. The number of times a particular AGP was given to previous flocks reared in the same house had no effect on the probability of isolating a resistant isolate.

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