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Ecological Light Pollution

Travis Longcore and Catherine Rich
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Vol. 2, No. 4 (May, 2004), pp. 191-198
Published by: Wiley
DOI: 10.2307/3868314
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3868314
Page Count: 8
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Ecological Light Pollution
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Abstract

Ecologists have long studied the critical role of natural light in regulating species interactions, but, with limited exceptions, have not investigated the consequences of artificial night lighting. In the past century, the extent and intensity of artificial night lighting has increased such that it has substantial effects on the biology and ecology of species in the wild. We distinguish "astronomical light pollution", which obscures the view of the night sky, from "ecological light pollution", which alters natural light regimes in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Some of the catastrophic consequences of light for certain taxonomic groups are well known, such as the deaths of migratory birds around tall lighted structures, and those of hatchling sea turtles disoriented by lights on their natal beaches. The more subtle influences of artificial night lighting on the behavior and community ecology of species are less well recognized, and constitute a new focus for research in ecology and a pressing conservation challenge.

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