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Lessons from Agriculture May Improve the Management of Invasive Plants in Wildland Systems

Richard G. Smith, Bruce D. Maxwell, Fabi�n D. Menalled and Lisa J. Rew
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Vol. 4, No. 8 (Oct., 2006), pp. 428-434
Published by: Wiley
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3868869
Page Count: 7
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Lessons from Agriculture May Improve the Management of Invasive Plants in Wildland Systems
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Abstract

The current motivating concept underlying our view of invasive plant species is that they are dangerous and destructive invaders that drive native plant communities to extinction and must be eradicated at almost any cost. This negative view of non-native plants has resulted in the adoption and implementation of control efforts that may not be entirely successful and have the potential to result in severe non-target effects. The history of weed control in agroecosystems may provide insights on how to deal with non-native plant species in non-croplands, and shed light on some of the potential consequences of current control programs for the environment and for non-target organisms. Alternative research and management foci, based on knowledge gleaned from agricultural systems, may improve the effectiveness and sustainability of non-native plant species management in range- and wildlands.

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