Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Alterations of Endogenous Cytokinins in Transgenic Plants Using a Chimeric Isopentenyl Transferase Gene

June I. Medford, Roger Horgan, Zaki El-Sawi and Harry J. Klee
The Plant Cell
Vol. 1, No. 4 (Apr., 1989), pp. 403-413
DOI: 10.2307/3869101
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3869101
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Alterations of Endogenous Cytokinins in Transgenic Plants Using a Chimeric Isopentenyl Transferase Gene
Preview not available

Abstract

Cytokinins, a class of phytohormones, appear to play an important role in the processes of plant development. We genetically engineered the Agrobacterium tumefaciens isopentenyl transferase gene, placing it under control of a heat-inducible promoter (maize hsp70). The chimeric hsp70 isopentenyl transferase gene was transferred to tobacco and Arabidopsis plants. Heat induction of transgenic plants caused the isopentenyl transferase mRNA to accumulate and increased the level of zeatin 52-fold, zeatin riboside 23-fold, and zeatin riboside 5′-monophosphate twofold. At the control temperature zeatin riboside and zeatin riboside 5′-monophosphate in transgenic plants accumulated to levels 3 and 7 times, respectively, over levels in wild-type plants. This uninduced cytokinin increase affected various aspects of development. In tobacco, these effects included release of axillary buds, reduced stem and leaf area, and an underdeveloped root system. In Arabidopsis, reduction of root growth was also found. However, neither tobacco nor Arabidopsis transgenic plants showed any differences relative to wild-type plants in time of flowering. Unexpectedly, heat induction of cytokinins in transgenic plants produced no changes beyond those seen in the uninduced state. The lack of effect from heat-induced increases could be a result of the transient increases in cytokinin levels, direct or indirect induction of negating factor(s), or lack of a corresponding level of competent cellular factors. Overall, the effects of the increased levels of endogenous cytokinins in non-heat-shocked transgenic plants seemed to be confined to aspects of growth rather than differentiation. Since no alterations in the programmed differentiation pattern were found with increased cytokinin levels, this process may be controlled by components other than absolute cytokinin levels.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[403]
    [403]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
404
    404
  • Thumbnail: Page 
405
    405
  • Thumbnail: Page 
406
    406
  • Thumbnail: Page 
407
    407
  • Thumbnail: Page 
408
    408
  • Thumbnail: Page 
409
    409
  • Thumbnail: Page 
410
    410
  • Thumbnail: Page 
411
    411
  • Thumbnail: Page 
412
    412
  • Thumbnail: Page 
413
    413