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Stress-Induced Translational Control in Potato Tubers May Be Mediated by Polysome-Associated Proteins

John S. Crosby and Michael E. Vayda
The Plant Cell
Vol. 3, No. 9 (Sep., 1991), pp. 1013-1023
DOI: 10.2307/3869162
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3869162
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Stress-Induced Translational Control in Potato Tubers May Be Mediated by Polysome-Associated Proteins
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Abstract

Potato tubers exhibit distinct responses to wounding and hypoxia that include selective translation of stress-induced mRNAs. Newly synthesized wound-response mRNAs are bound to polysomes, whereas preexisting mRNAs are displaced and degraded. mRNAs that are induced and translated during hypoxic conditions are bound to ribosomes as expected. However, preexisting wound-response mRNAs whose translation is inhibited during hypoxia remain bound to polysomes, indicating that there are at least two distinct mechanisms by which translation is regulated in response to stress conditions. A 32-kD phosphoprotein is associated with polyribosomes from wounded tubers. This protein remains polysome bound as long as wound-response mRNAs are present, even during hypoxia when these mRNAs are no longer translated. However, association of the 32-kD protein with polysomes is not elicited by hypoxic stress alone. The kinase that phosphorylates this protein is active only for the first 24 hr after wounding and is not active during periods of hypoxia. This protein may mediate recognition of the wound-response mRNAs by ribosomes.

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