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Identification of Pseudomonas syringae Pathogens of Arabidopsis and a Bacterial Locus Determining Avirulence on Both Arabidopsis and Soybean

Maureen C. Whalen, Roger W. Innes, Andrew F. Bent and Brian J. Staskawicz
The Plant Cell
Vol. 3, No. 1 (Jan., 1991), pp. 49-59
DOI: 10.2307/3869199
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3869199
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Identification of Pseudomonas syringae Pathogens of Arabidopsis and a Bacterial Locus Determining Avirulence on Both Arabidopsis and Soybean
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Abstract

To develop a model system for molecular genetic analysis of plant-pathogen interactions, we studied the interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst). Pst strains were found to be virulent or avirulent on specific Arabidopsis ecotypes, and single ecotypes were resistant to some Pst strains and susceptible to others. In many plant-pathogen interactions, disease resistance is controlled by the simultaneous presence of single plant resistance genes and single pathogen avirulence genes. Therefore, we tested whether avirulence genes in Pst controlled induction of resistance in Arabidopsis. Cosmids that determine avirulence were isolated from Pst genomic libraries, and the Pst avirulence locus avrRpt2 was defined. This allowed us to construct pathogens that differed only by the presence or absence of a single putative avirulence gene. We found that Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0 was susceptible to Pst strain DC3000 but resistant to the same strain carrying avrRpt2, suggesting that a single locus in Col-0 determines resistance. As a first step toward genetically mapping the postulated resistance locus, an ecotype susceptible to infection by DC3000 carrying avrRpt2 was identified. The avrRpt2 locus from Pst was also moved into virulent strains of the soybean pathogen P. syringae pv glycinea to test whether this locus could determine avirulence on soybean. The resulting strains induced a resistant response in a cultivar-specific manner, suggesting that similar resistance mechanisms may function in Arabidopsis and soybean.

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