Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The TM5 MADS Box Gene Mediates Organ Differentiation in the Three Inner Whorls of Tomato Flowers

Lilac Pnueli, Dana Hareven, Limor Broday, Charles Hurwitz and Eliezer Lifschitz
The Plant Cell
Vol. 6, No. 2 (Feb., 1994), pp. 175-186
DOI: 10.2307/3869637
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3869637
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The TM5 MADS Box Gene Mediates Organ Differentiation in the Three Inner Whorls of Tomato Flowers
Preview not available

Abstract

The tomato MADS box gene no. 5 (TM5) is shown here to be expressed in meristematic domains fated to form the three inner whorls-petals, stamens, and gynoecia-of the tomato flower. TM5 is also expressed during organogenesis and in the respective mature organs of these three whorls. This is unlike the major organ identity genes of the MADS box family from Antirrhinum and Arabidopsis, which function in overlapping primordial territories consisting of only two floral whorls each. The developmental relevance of the unique expression pattern of this putative homeotic gene was examined in transgenic plants. In agreement with the expression patterns, antisense RNA of the TM5 gene conferred both early and late alterations of morphogenetic markers. Early defects consist of additional whorls or of a wrong number of organs per whorl. Late, organ-specific changes include evergreen, cauline, and unabscised petals; green, dialytic, and sterile anthers; and sterile carpels and defective styles on which glandular trichomes characteristic of sepals and petals are ectopically formed. However, a complete homeotic transformation of either organ was not observed. The early and late floral phenotypes of TM5 antisense plants suggest that TM5 mediates two unrelated secondary regulatory systems. One system is the early function of the floral meristem identity genes, and the other system is the function of the major floral organ identity genes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[175]
    [175]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
176
    176
  • Thumbnail: Page 
177
    177
  • Thumbnail: Page 
178
    178
  • Thumbnail: Page 
179
    179
  • Thumbnail: Page 
180
    180
  • Thumbnail: Page 
181
    181
  • Thumbnail: Page 
182
    182
  • Thumbnail: Page 
183
    183
  • Thumbnail: Page 
184
    184
  • Thumbnail: Page 
185
    185
  • Thumbnail: Page 
186
    186