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Gnarley1 Is a Dominant Mutation in the knox4 Homeobox Gene Affecting Cell Shape and Identity

Toshi Foster, Judy Yamaguchi, Bryan C. Wong, Bruce Veit and Sarah Hake
The Plant Cell
Vol. 11, No. 7 (Jul., 1999), pp. 1239-1252
DOI: 10.2307/3870746
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3870746
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Gnarley1 Is a Dominant Mutation in the knox4 Homeobox Gene Affecting Cell Shape and Identity
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Abstract

Maize leaves have a stereotypical pattern of cell types organized into discrete domains. These domains are altered by mutations in knotted1 (kn1) and knox (for kn1-like homeobox) genes. Gnarley (Gn1) is a dominant maize mutant that exhibits many of the phenotypic characteristics of the kn1 family of mutants. Gn1 is unique because it changes parameters of cell growth in the basal-most region of the leaf, the sheath, resulting in dramatically altered sheath morphology. The strongly expressive allele Gn1-R also gives rise to a floral phenotype in which ectopic carpels form. Introgression studies showed that the severity of the Gn1-conferred phenotype is strongly influenced by genetic background. Gn1 maps to knox4, and knox4 is ectopically expressed in plants with the Gn1-conferred phenotype. Immunolocalization experiments showed that the KNOX protein accumulates at the base of Gn1 leaves in a pattern that is spatially and temporally correlated with appearance of the mutant phenotype. We further demonstrate that Gn1 is knox4 by correlating loss of the mutant phenotype with insertion of a Mutator transposon into knox4.

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