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Phenotype of the Tomato high pigment-2 Mutant Is Caused by a Mutation in the Tomato Homolog of DEETIOLATED1

Anna Chiara Mustilli, Francesca Fenzi, Rosalia Ciliento, Flora Alfano and Chris Bowler
The Plant Cell
Vol. 11, No. 2 (Feb., 1999), pp. 145-157
DOI: 10.2307/3870847
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3870847
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Phenotype of the Tomato high pigment-2 Mutant Is Caused by a Mutation in the Tomato Homolog of DEETIOLATED1
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Abstract

Tomato high pigment (hp) mutants are characterized by their exaggerated photoresponsiveness. Light-grown hp mutants display elevated levels of anthocyanins, are shorter and darker than wild-type plants, and have dark green immature fruits due to the overproduction of chlorophyll pigments. It has been proposed that HP genes encode negative regulators of phytochrome signal transduction. We have cloned the HP-2 gene and found that it encodes the tomato homolog of the nuclear protein DEETIOLATED1 (DET1) from Arabidopsis. Mutations in DET1 are known to result in constitutive deetiolation in darkness. In contrast to det1 mutants, tomato hp-2 mutants do not display any visible phenotypes in the dark but only very weak phenotypes, such as partial chloroplast development. Furthermore, whereas det1 mutations are epistatic to mutations in phytochrome genes, analysis of similar double mutants in tomato showed that manifestation of the phenotype of the hp-2 mutant is strictly dependent upon the presence of active phytochrome. Because only one DET1 gene is likely to be present in each of the two species, our data suggest that the phytochrome signaling pathways in which the corresponding proteins function are regulated differently in Arabidopsis and tomato.

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