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Characterization of the FIDDLEHEAD Gene of Arabidopsis Reveals a Link between Adhesion Response and Cell Differentiation in the Epidermis

Alexander Yephremov, Ellen Wisman, Peter Huijser, Casper Huijser, Kirsten Wellesen and Heinz Saedler
The Plant Cell
Vol. 11, No. 11 (Nov., 1999), pp. 2187-2201
DOI: 10.2307/3871018
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3871018
Page Count: 15
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Characterization of the FIDDLEHEAD Gene of Arabidopsis Reveals a Link between Adhesion Response and Cell Differentiation in the Epidermis
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Abstract

We report the isolation of the FIDDLEHEAD (FDH) gene of Arabidopsis by transposon tagging. Three mutant alleles of FDH carrying insertions of the Enhancer/Suppressor-mutator transposon and one stable allele with a transposon foot-print were generated in the Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia genetic background. Closer examination of the adaxial epidermis of rosette leaves revealed that in addition to provoking the previously described fusion phenotype in leaves and floral organs, mutations in FDH have a deleterious effect on trichome differentiation. FDH transcripts were detected exclusively in the epidermis of young vegetative and floral organs. Plants overexpressing FDH under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter segregated fdh phenocopies, wild-type individuals, and plants showing severe retardation of growth and development. The dwarf plants displayed the most FDH expression, the fdh phenocopies generally the least. The protein product of FDH shows similarity to condensing enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis, particularly those of the FATTY ACID ELONGATION family.

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