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The Late Developmental Pattern of Mu Transposon Excision Is Conferred by a Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S-Driven MURA cDNA in Transgenic Maize

Manish N. Raizada and Virginia Walbot
The Plant Cell
Vol. 12, No. 1 (Jan., 2000), pp. 5-21
DOI: 10.2307/3871026
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3871026
Page Count: 17
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Late Developmental Pattern of Mu Transposon Excision Is Conferred by a Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S-Driven MURA cDNA in Transgenic Maize
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Abstract

The MuDR element responsible for Mutator activities in maize encodes two genes, mudrA and mudrB. Each encodes multiple transcripts hypothesized to regulate, directly or indirectly, the unique late timing and switch in transposition mechanism during maize development. mudrA, which encodes the MURA transposase, is unstable in bacterial plasmids, a technical problem solved by using phage M13 as a vector to prepare DNA for biolistic transformation. In transgenic maize, a single 2.7-kb mudrA cDNA predicted to encode an 823-amino acid protein is sufficient to catalyze late somatic excisions, despite removal of the native promoter, alternative transcription start sites, known introns, polymorphic 5′ and 3′ untranslated sequences, and the mudrB gene. These results suggest that post-translational regulation confers Mu excision timing. The transgene is active in lines containing silencing MuDR elements. This suggests that endogenous MuDR transposons do not measurably immunize the host against expression of a homologous transgene.

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