Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Arabidopsis RGL1 Encodes a Negative Regulator of Gibberellin Responses

Chi-Kuang Wen and Caren Chang
The Plant Cell
Vol. 14, No. 1 (Jan., 2002), pp. 87-100
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3871484
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Arabidopsis RGL1 Encodes a Negative Regulator of Gibberellin Responses
Preview not available

Abstract

In Arabidopsis, the DELLA subfamily of GRAS regulatory genes consists of GAI, RGA, RGA-LIKE1 (RGL1), RGL2, and RGL3. GAI and RGA are known to be negative regulators of gibberellin (GA) responses. We found that RGL1 is a similar repressor of GA responses, as revealed by RGL1 gain-of-function and loss-of-function phenotypes. Repression of GA responses in Arabidopsis was conferred by a dominant 35S-rgl1 transgene carrying a DELLA domain deletion analogous to the GA-insensitive gai-1 mutation. As in GA-deficient Arabidopsis, the transgenic plants were dark green dwarfs with underdeveloped trichomes and flowers. Expression levels of GA4, a feedback-regulated GA biosynthetic gene, were increased correspondingly. Conversely, a loss-of-function rgl1 line had reduced GA4 expression and exhibited GA-independent activation of seed germination, leaf expansion, flowering, stem elongation, and floral development, as detected by resistance to the GA biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol. RGL1 plays a greater role in seed germination than do GAI and RGA. The expression profile of RGL1 differed from those of the four other DELLA homologs. RGL1 message levels were predominant in flowers, with transcripts detected in developing ovules and anthers. As with RGA, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged RGL1 protein was localized to the nucleus, but unlike GFP-RGA, there was no degradation after GA treatment. These findings indicate that RGL1 is a partially redundant, but distinct, negative regulator of GA responses and suggest that all DELLA subfamily members might possess separate as well as overlapping roles in GA signaling.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[87]
    [87]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100