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Seasonal Movements of an Alaska Peninsula Brown Bear Population

Leland P. Glenn and Leo H. Miller
Bears: Their Biology and Management
Vol. 4, A Selection of Papers from the Fourth International Conference on Bear Research and Management, Kalispell, Montana, USA, February 1977 (1980), pp. 307-312
DOI: 10.2307/3872885
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3872885
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Seasonal Movements of an Alaska Peninsula Brown Bear Population
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Abstract

On the central Alaska Peninsula, 344 different coastal brown bears (Ursus arctos L.) were immobilized and marked during 5 spring seasons. Between 1970 and 1976, the observed locations of 123 marked bears were determined 354 times, and the locations of 139 marked bears killed by hunters during spring and fall hunting seasons were recorded. Bears moved greater distances per unit of time during spring than during other seasons of the year. Summer movements were restricted as bears concentrated along streams to feed on salmon. Dispersal away from streams began in late summer. Denning usually began by mid-November, but some bears remained out of hibernation through mid-December. The seasonal ranges of 30 adult females averaged 293 km2 and those of 4 adult males averaged 262 km2. Limited movement data for adult males suggested that males spent more time than females in or near escape cover. The mobility and spring distribution of adult females were related to changes in their reproductive status. Single adult females moved further than females accompanied by young. Females with 1- to 3-year-old young utilized open lowland areas during the spring and tended to be in mountainous terrain when breeding and when accompanied by young through age 6 months. Subadult males were more transient than females, tending to move out of their maternal seasonal range after family separation; subadult females tended to remain. The seasonal range of 5 subadult males and of 6 subadult females averaged 740 km2 and 224 km2, respectively.

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