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Lilian Vaughan Morgan (1870-1952): Her Life and Work

Katherine Keenan
American Zoologist
Vol. 23, No. 4, The Place of Thomas Hunt Morgan in American Biology (1983), pp. 867-876
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3882800
Page Count: 10
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Lilian Vaughan Morgan (1870-1952): Her Life and Work
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Abstract

Lilian Vaughan Morgan was an important geneticist of the first part of the 20th century. She discovered both the attached-X and closed-X chromosomes as part of her extensive research on the X chromosome of Drosophila. She received A.B and M.S. degrees in Biology from Bryn Mawr College and became an independent investigator in the 1890s at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Although her research at the turn of the century was in embryology, she made the successful transition to genetics. In 1904 she married T. H. Morgan, raised four children, managed the Morgan household, and when the children were grown resumed full time research. She always worked independently, and in her lifetime published 16 single author papers.

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