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Kingdom Animalia: The Zoological Malaise from a Microbial Perspective

Lynn Margulis
American Zoologist
Vol. 30, No. 4 (1990), pp. 861-875
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3883444
Page Count: 15
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Kingdom Animalia: The Zoological Malaise from a Microbial Perspective
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Abstract

Pain and cognitive dissonance abounds amongst biologists: the plant-animal, botany-zoology wound has nearly healed and the new gash-revealed by department and budget reorganizations-is "molecular" vs. "organismic" biology. Here I contend that resolution of these tensions within zoology requires that an autopoietic-gaian view replace a mechanical-neodarwinian perspective; in the interest of brevity and since many points have been discussed elsewhere, rather than develop detailed arguments I must make staccato statements and refer to a burgeoning literature. The first central concept is that animals, all organisms developing from blastular embryos, evolved from single protist cells that were unable to reproduce their undulipodia. The second points to the usefulness of recognizing the analogy between cyclically established symbioses and meiotic sexuality.

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