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The Significance of an Early Date for Pottery and Sheep in Zimbabwe

N. J. Walker
The South African Archaeological Bulletin
Vol. 38, No. 138 (Dec., 1983), pp. 88-92
DOI: 10.2307/3888641
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3888641
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Significance of an Early Date for Pottery and Sheep in Zimbabwe
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Abstract

Recent research at Bambata Cave in the Matopos has yielded an early date of just over 2100 B.P. for sheep and pottery associated with Later Stone Age material. On the basis of linguistic, ethnographic and archaeological evidence, it is hypothesized that Cape Khoi pastoralism probably arose in south-western Zimbabwe or adjacent Botswana, following contacts by hunter-gatherers with early Iron Age immigrants. No definite early pastoral sites have yet been located in Zimbabwe, but it is argued that Bambata Cave provides evidence of the contact necessary before such acculturation, if not an early stage of it.

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