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Journal Article

Excavations at Geduld and the Appearance of Early Domestic Stock in Namibia

Andrew B. Smith, Royden Yates, Duncan Miller, Leon Jacobson and Gavin Evans
The South African Archaeological Bulletin
Vol. 50, No. 161 (Jun., 1995), pp. 3-20
DOI: 10.2307/3889270
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3889270
Page Count: 18

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Topics: Bead welding, Pottery, Eggshells, Decorative ceramics, Excavations, Pastoralism, Bones, Diameters, Feces, Shelters
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Abstract

Excavations at Geduld in northern Namibia have produced a ceramic sequence beginning 2000 years ago. They also indicate the first appearance of domestic stock by at least 1800 BP. Although ostrich eggshell beads show an increase in size with the appearance of the relatively sophisticated ceramics and larger beads have been suggested as indicators of herding societies, there is no change in stone tool types across the ceramic threshold. This may indicate that, rather than dealing with pastoralists at Geduld, the former occupants of the site were hunters on the periphery of a pastoralist society which has yet to be identified in northern Namibia c. 1800 BP and from whom pottery and stock were obtained. The extreme aridity of the area has preserved many plant species, some of which were eaten, others used for medicinal purposes. Appended are analyses of iron objects, one from a level dated c. 1790 BP, and ostrich eggshell beads.

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