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Journal Article

Strike-Induced Chemosensory Searching and Trail following by Prairie Rattlesnakes (Crotalus viridis) Preying upon Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus): Chemical Discrimination among Individual Mice

Kim Furry, Tom Swain and David Chiszar
Herpetologica
Vol. 47, No. 1 (Mar., 1991), pp. 69-78
Published by: Allen Press on behalf of the Herpetologists' League
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3892816
Page Count: 10

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Topics: Mice, Snakes, Prairies, Deer, Rodents, Herpetology, Odors, Venoms, T tests, Animal traps
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Strike-Induced Chemosensory Searching and Trail following by Prairie Rattlesnakes (Crotalus viridis) Preying upon Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus): Chemical Discrimination among Individual Mice
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Abstract

Prairie rattlesnakes, Crotalus viridis, responded to natural prey, Peromyscus maniculatus, with the same motor patterns seen when Mus musculus were prey (experiments 1 and 2). Further, C. viridis rapidly formed chemical search images of these natural prey (experiments 3 and 4). With the snake behind a barrier, chemical trails were made with two deer mice, neither envenomated. Then the snake struck one of these mice and was allowed to choose between the two trails, with neither mouse present. The trail previously made by the mouse that was eventually struck was selected on 83.3% of the trials. Results were identical when the the two trails were made with sibling mice raised together.

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