Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Population Dynamics of the Saxicolous Lizard Tropidurus itambere (Tropiduridae) in a Seasonal Habitat of Southeastern Brazil

Monique Van Sluys
Herpetologica
Vol. 56, No. 1 (Mar., 2000), pp. 55-62
Published by: Allen Press on behalf of the Herpetologists' League
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3893127
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Population Dynamics of the Saxicolous Lizard Tropidurus itambere (Tropiduridae) in a Seasonal Habitat of Southeastern Brazil
Preview not available

Abstract

I studied the population dynamics of Tropidurus itambere in an outcrop formation in Valinhos, São Paulo State, southeastern Brazil. I carried out a mark-recapture study on a 1.72 ha grid from February 1993 to January 1995. I estimated density (number of individuals/ha), biomass (g/ha), sex ratio, age structure, and the observed population growth rate (r) monthly. Survival (persistence) rates of males and females were estimated between successive reproductive seasons. Density varied seasonally, increasing during the recruitment period. The observed population growth rates varied monthly and their mean value (r̄ = 0.015) was positive, though small, suggesting that this population was marginally increasing. The sex ratio of juveniles was 1:1, suggesting there is no between-sex differences in birth rate. Within adults, female-biased sex ratios occurred during the reproductive seasons (December-March), and these biases may result from the spacing pattern of adults in the habitat in these seasons. Survival rates between successive reproductive seasons did not differ statistically between sexes, although survival rates for females (0.35) were higher than for males (0.25).

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62