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Comparative Mineral Composition of Longstalk and Alsike Clovers

John W. Hamilton and Carl S. Gilbert
Journal of Range Management
Vol. 21, No. 1 (Jan., 1968), pp. 53-55
DOI: 10.2307/3896244
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3896244
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Comparative Mineral Composition of Longstalk and Alsike Clovers
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Abstract

Longstalk and alsike clovers are widely distributed in many areas of the United States. These clovers have similar growth requirements and often grow side by side. Longstalk, a valuable native range plant, on the basis of mineral and proximate composition appears to be equal to alsike clover in all respects, but not markedly superior. Both clovers are good pasture, range, and hay plants. They are highly palatable, and furnish nutritious forage for livestock and game animals.

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