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Pronghorn Reactions to Winter Sheep Grazing, Plant Communities, and Topography in the Great Basin

Warren P. Clary and Donald M. Beale
Journal of Range Management
Vol. 36, No. 6 (Nov., 1983), pp. 749-752
DOI: 10.2307/3898201
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3898201
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Pronghorn Reactions to Winter Sheep Grazing, Plant Communities, and Topography in the Great Basin
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Abstract

The winter distribution of pronghorn over a $142\text{-}{\rm km}^{2}$ area on the Desert Experimental Range was significantly related to sheep grazing during the current winter, presence of black sagebrush, and topographic characteristics. Even moderate sheep use during the dormant period left grazing units relatively unfavorable for pronghorn until spring regrowth-at least on ranges where key pronghorn forage plants were in short supply. Winter use areas preferred by pronghorn were above the valley bottoms in rolling to broken topography where black sagebrush communities were evident. Movement characteristics of pronghorn have allowed many of them to readily locate rested grazing units, and, therefore, avoid severe dietary competition with sheep.

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