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How Komondor Dogs Reduce Sheep Losses to Coyotes

John C. McGrew and Cindy S. Blakesley
Journal of Range Management
Vol. 35, No. 6 (Nov., 1982), pp. 693-696
DOI: 10.2307/3898240
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3898240
Page Count: 4
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Abstract

Nine Komondor dogs were observed guarding lambs in two 65-ha enclosures for 21 days each. Each enclosure had a resident coyote chosen for sheep-killing ability. Komondorok guarded sheep by being near the flock and actively defending it when necessary. Guarding was most effective in the area where the dogs spent most of their time. Aggressive dogs were generally more successful protecting their sheep. The sheep learned to run to or stand with the dogs when attacked, and usually bedded with the dog. The coyotes learned to attack the flock when the dog was not present. Effectiveness of Komondor dogs can be enhanced by exploiting breed characteristics.

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