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An Economic Analysis of Two Systems and Three Levels of Grazing on Ponderosa Pine-Bunchgrass Range

Thomas M. Quigley, Jon M. Skovlin and John P. Workman
Journal of Range Management
Vol. 37, No. 4 (Jul., 1984), pp. 309-312
DOI: 10.2307/3898700
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3898700
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
An Economic Analysis of Two Systems and Three Levels of Grazing on Ponderosa Pine-Bunchgrass Range
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Abstract

A long-term study of the effects of season-long and deferred rotation grazing at different stocking rates examined cow and calf weight gains. Production functions were derived using stocking rate (AUM's/ha) as a variable input and average summer weight gain (kg/ha) as the output. These functions were optimized economically to determine profit maximizing stocking rates. Optimum stocking rates for season-long grazing on ponderosa pine-bunchgrass range were found to be moderate or light over a wide range of feasible price ratios. Optimum stocking rates for deferred rotation grazing did not exceed a moderate level at any feasible price ratio. The ratio of forage price ($/AUM) to the price of livestock ($/kg) must exceed 11 under deferred rotation grazing and 18 under season-long grazing before light stocking becomes the optimum. Based on fall 1979 livestock and forage prices, the stocking rate for profit maximization was moderate (.235 AUM/ha or 10.6 acres/AUM) for deferred rotation and moderate (.312 AUM/ha or 7.9 acres/AUM) for season-long. Season-long grazing also produced a higher net return than did deferred rotation. To remain at the profit maximizing stocking rate while shifting from season-long to deferred rotation, a manager would have to reduce the stocking level at all price ratios.

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